dog bite insurance settlements
To ensure a case will be heard, make sure it is filed before the deadline passes. Dog bites are a serious concern and Florida dog bite laws are meant to protect the public.

Laws Pertaining to Pet Animal Attacks

Dog bites have become a growing concern across the US, and in an effort to combat the Florida dog bite epidemic the state has enacted legislation designed to protect the public from dangerous dogs and their owners. Florida's dog bite statute, FLSA 767.04, states that a dog owner is liable for injuries if the dog bites another person, and/or the person is in a public place or lawfully in a private place. Owners of dogs that attack people run the risk of exorbitant dog bite insurance settlements. A vicious dog is typically defined as one that “seriously injures or kills a person that is lawfully on the owner's premises without provocation.” Dangerous dog laws impose regulations on owners by examining the behavioral history of any particular dog and owner rather than basing a determination of just how dangerous an animal is based on breed alone. Two types of legislation have emerged nation-wide in an attempt to provide the most effective and efficient means of bite prevention: dangerous-dog laws and breed-specific legislation.

Dangerous-dog laws

This law is designed to determine whether a dog is vicious or dangerous and impose ownership regulations based on the particular dog's prior conduct. In contrast, breed-specific legislation regulates or bans ownership of particular breeds based on a belief that the breed is inherently vicious or dangerous.

Breed-specific legislation

Breed-specific laws are the primary means of regulating dangerous dogs or may be supplemental to existing state or local dangerous-dog laws. Though the laws impose ownership regulations based on dissimilar criteria, both have been subject to constitutional attack. More than thirty states (and the District of Columbia), and numerous cities have enacted dangerous dog laws as a means of addressing the dog-bite epidemic.

Deadlines to file a lawsuit

Florida has a statute of limitations that limits the amount of time an injured person has to file a lawsuit after a dog bite injury. The statute of limitations requires an injured person to get their lawsuit filed in Florida's civil court system within four years of the date of a dog bite. For anyone that misses the four-year deadline, the court will likely throw the case out instead of hearing it. To ensure a case will be heard, make sure it is filed before the deadline passes. Dog bites are a serious concern and Florida dog bite laws are meant to protect the public. An owner can help protect himself from costly dog bite insurance settlements by keeping his or her dog leashed whenever they are out in a public place.

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